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©Juliet Sheath
©Michele Oberdieck
©Giles Porter
©Michele Oberdieck
©Giles Porter

Michèle Oberdieck

Michèle Oberdieck Glass sculptor
©Juliet Sheath

Reinterpreting the Graal technique

  • • Michèle is inspired by natural forms and organic structures
  • • Her vessels work against symmetry, creating fluidity and movement
  • • Colour has always been a major element in her work

Michèle Oberdieck followed a Bachelor's in Printed and Knitted Textiles at the Glasgow School of Art with a Master's in Ceramics and Glass from The Royal College of Art, after a career in textiles. At first, she planned to study Architectural glass, but she became entranced when she saw the way molten colour moved, how malleable it was, and the soft forms which could be created. “Blown glass is a very seductive medium,” she says. From an early age, Oberdieck wanted to make her living from being creative. “There was a lot of creativity on my mothers’ side. My maternal grandmother was a hat designer and then a painter, and my mother made miniature rooms modelled on historical characters.” Her studio is based in Cockpit Arts where she works surrounded by like-minded creatives. One of her focuses is redeveloping the classic Swedish technique of Graal.

Read the full interview

Works

  • ©Michele Oberdieck
  • ©Michele Oberdieck
  • ©Michele Oberdieck
  • ©Juliet Sheath
  • ©Michele Oberdieck
Photo: ©Michele Oberdieck
Fog Marsh Bowl, Tall Tea Soleus and Tall Hellebore Soleus

This is a grouping of three blown glass vessels made in response to the Ostfriesland landscape. The area is full of canals and marshlands with fog softly powdering the skylines.

Width 22 cm
Height 28 cm
Depth 10 cm
Width 12 cm
Height 60 cm
Depth 7 cm
Width 12 cm
Height 46 cm
Depth 7 cm

Photo: ©Michele Oberdieck
Haar round & Mauve round

A pair of blown glass vessels inspired by the Ostfriesland landscape drawn from memories of family holidays. Crisp blue skies, and fields in bloom incite the coming spring.

Width 26 cm
Height 26 cm
Depth 13 cm

Photo: ©Michele Oberdieck
Coral Ventricle

This sculptural blown glass vessel was created using the classic Swedish Graal technique and a cut pattern to explore the balance of transparency and opacity and the effect of light being diffused through it.

Width 26 cm
Height 28 cm
Depth 14 cm

Photo: ©Juliet Sheath
Oria Collection

The Oria glass pendant lights take their forms from blossoms, and colours from jewels.

Width 13 cm
Height 20 cm

Photo: ©Michele Oberdieck
Ostfriesia II Distraction Vessel

This vessel has a slight twist which gives it the appearance of looking both forward and backward, hence the name Distraction. It is inspired by the Ostfriesland landscape, with the colours of Delft Blue and Celadon as a nod to Dutch and Chinese influences on porcelain.

Width 20 cm
Height 31 cm
Depth 15 cm

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